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Area Students Show Off Their Business Skills

Area Students Show Off Their Business Skills

Children displayed their entrepreneurial spirit Saturday afternoon as they promoted their businesses during the Hardin County Children’s Business Fair.
Around 20 children set up businesses that included craft items, baked goods and artwork at John Hardin High School.
Daniel Koellish, 7, sold bracelets and bath salts with a very convincing sales pitch. He described his products in detail to potential customers, even letting them smell each bath salt and telling them which ones were most popular.
Daniel, who attends Barry Hahn Primary School in Meade County, got the idea to make the bracelets when he watched a fishing video with his mom. It said you could use beads to keep the sinker and the hook apart, he said. He then started using the beads for bracelets. He sells them at farmers markets and other locations.
“I sell them to make money to buy things that interest me like Pokémon cards and maybe books on Pokémon,” he said.
Elijah Bunch also was at the business fair. The 13-year-old goes to Wedgwood Academy North in Radcliff.
He was there selling baked goods.
He started his business because he wanted a computer and wanted to earn money to buy one.
“I did something I was pretty good at,” he said.
It took him about a year and a half to earn the money for his goal.
Elijah thinks it’s a good idea for students to start their own business.
“You have to figure out early on if you are going to follow somebody or do something on your own,” he said.
Layla Carden, 9, a student at Cecilia Valley Elementary School, had earrings, necklaces and bracelets for sale on Saturday.
“My mom introduced me to a small business place. I thought it was really cool that they had a small business, and I wanted to have one of my own,” she said.
Layla had been saving up money for something to buy, but decided to put that money into her business instead. She’s been in business as Bug’s Boutique for about a year. She named it that because her nickname has been Bug since she was a baby.
“I think it’s an amazing experience and, if you make money, you can buy your own stuff or set it aside to make your business bigger,” she said. “It’s very fun, but sometimes you get some hand cramps from making jewelry.”
The children were able to sell their products to shoppers and also were competing for a $200 prize that was won by Kaleb’s Kreation organic dog treats.

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